SOLD   Burger Brothers First National Confederate Cavalry Guidon with Rebel Relics Strong eye appeal.  This Burger Brothers First National Confederate Cavalry Guidon will literally stand tall in any civil war relics collection.  If you surf the internet and walk the civil war relics shows you see the Rebel Relics Pricing Rocks.  I have seen just the Burger Brothers First National Confederate Cavalry Guidon thousands more.  This Rebel Relics Deal includes the original Confederate Richmond Lance.  The Richmond Lance alone is a $4,500.00 value.

Burger Brothers First National Confederate Cavalry Guidon and original Richmond Lance.  This Burger Brothers First National Confederate Cavalry Guidon has been encapsulated in archival mylar.  I had this work done by Heritage Conservation in Virginia.  We added a magnet strip to the backing and the lance straps.  This Burger Brothers First National Confederate Cavalry Guidon is protected and can be displayed with all the respect of it's original glory.  Please check out all the images I have posted.  Then let your mind see this Burger Brothers First National Confederate Cavalry Guidon in your War Room.   Either has carried vertical or horizontal along the ceiling.

The ladies that made these flags and sold them to Burger Brothers were true Southern Patriots.  Hetty Carr Cary was one of the makers of these Confederate Flags.  She was also the maker of the very first Confederate Battle Flag.  I will include a conservation report from Heritage Conversations and a letter of authenticity from myself.  This Burger Brothers First National Confederate Cavalry Guidon is in wonderful condition with only expected wear from service.  I love the stains from the metal straps.  You can see the wear from being attached to the Richmond Lance.  This Richmond Lance is a true civil war relics super star all by itself.  These two Rebel Relics together is just another World Famous Rebel Relics instant classic

Confederate Flag History from Greg Briggs ...........

Ever since the days of mounted knights in armor in Europe, small flags attached to the
lances were part of the units so equipped for battle.  The Austrians and Poles formed
units bearing such weapons from the 16th into the 18th Centuries, the most famous
being the Polish Winged Hussars.  In the Napoleonic Wars, French lancer units, based
on the Polish model and consisting of Polish and French troops, bore lances with small
flags as did their foes, the Prussian Uhlans and British lancers.  The Mexican army in
the Texas War of Independence and the later Mexican War, an army modeled on that of
Napoleon's had lancer units whose lances had small flags attached.

Lancer units were not a big part of American mounted forces history other than a few
exceptions in the state militias.  The National Lancers of Massachusetts formed in 1836
and wore uniforms identical to the Polish lancers of Napoleon's Grande Armee.  With
the coming of the Civil War in 1861, both sides raised some lancer units.  The most
famous for the Union was the 6th Pennsylvania Cavalry, also called Rush's Lancers.
However, the terrain in the Eastern Theater, where the regiment would fight, was not
conducive to such weapons and they were soon retired from use.  Michigan raised the
1st Michigan Lancers while a company of lancers equipped the 1st West Virginia
Cavalry for a time.  The 1st Regiment, United States Lancers, evolved into part of the
4th Iowa Cavalry and Missouri had at least two companies of Unionist lancers
The Confederates also tried to raise lancer units in the East, West and the Trans-
Mississippi equipping them with pikes and lances bearing small versions of the
Confederate First National flags in a swallow-tail configuration. This followed the
pattern for lance pennants in prior eras.  A lancer regiment in Memphis, Tennessee
failed to fully organize.  Wise's Virginia Legion in the Eastern Theater had a lancer unit
in 1861; 1st Regiment Cavalry, Wise's Legion (later the 8th Virginia Cavalry Battalion
and then the 10th Virginia Cavalry).  Tom Rosser’s 5th Virginia Cavalry initially
equipped as lancers and retained some for a time as they used them in routing Federal
cavalry at Catlett's Station in Virginia in August 1862.
The bulk of the Confederate lancer units were raised in the Trans-Mississippi however.
In Missouri, Alonzo Slayback's 5th Mounted Infantry were raised initially as lancers
while in Arkansas, the 1st Arkansas Mounted Rifles had one company of lancers.
Texas raised the most lancer units.  Some of the 4th and 5th Texas Mounted Volunteers
carried lances bearing small red pennants in Gen. Sibley's invasion of New Mexico
Territory in early 1862; the two companies of the 5th launched one of two mounted
attacks by Confederate lancer units in the entire war at Valverde.  The 1st, 2nd and 3rd
Texas Lancers evolved from Carter's Lancers but these were repurposed and
renumbered at the 21st, 24th and 25 Texas Cavalry regiments respectively.
 The Union and Confederacy soon got rid of lancer units preferring to go with sabers
and firearms instead.

three contractors have been identified to date for making lance pennants for the
Confederacy, all in Virginia.  Hetty Cary, one of the Carys that helped sew the prototype
Southern Cross battle flags for what would become the Army of Northern Virginia in the
fall of 1861, contracted for 1000 lance pennants on March 28, 1862.  The late Howard
Madaus believed that these were for Tom Rosser's 5th Virginia Cavalry.  He made this
deduction with post-war comments by Rosser himself.  Additionally, besides the 5th
Virginia, the only other known lancer unit in the Confederate east was that of Wise’s
Legion. Based on the surviving records, Cary made the most of any contractor.
Laura Lacy, of Richmond, sewed 83 "lance flags" billing them to the CS Ordnance
Bureau on August 26th, 1861.  In October, she sewed a further 200 lance pennants at
the request of Col. St. George Croghan, commander of the cavalry portion of Wise’s
Legion.  She billed $1.20 for each pennant.
Burger & Brothers, also of Richmond, were immigrants from Bavaria and Wurttemberg
manufacturing saws in the city.  With the war, they began making Bowie knives, artillery
staves, Roman swords (for the artillery), lances, pikes and saber bayonets.  They also
made lance pennants.  The firm had a tie to Laura Lacy for on their invoice of August
23/24, 1861 they billed $5 each for 83 lances - which would be equipped with the lance
pennants made by Lacy that same time.  Burger & Brothers had a final invoice in
January/February 1862 for sword bayonets and 458 "lances and flags."  It is not known
currently what unit these were for.
For the majority of the pennants that survive today, the stars only had four points and
were crudely sewn to the canton and the lance pennant offered here is of that style.  At
least eighteen other lance pennants with this type of stars exist today. The stars are
sewn usually only on one side as is the case with this pennant in a somewhat
haphazard pattern. However, on some, one can make out the letters “CSA” in the stars
which cross over each other.  Very few had five pointed stars.
None of the three known makers of lance pennants marked their flags with names so
whoever made those that exist, including the one being offered, is unknown.
With the failure of lancer units to form and/or be effective on a Civil War battlefield, the
Confederacy, never one to waste much, probably turned these small flags into troop
guidons although that is conjecture.  There is nothing in the cavalry drill manual of the
time that called for such flags.  Be that as it may, that is the most likely use of them
unless some were also presented to horse artillery batteries.  The record is not totally
clear and much more needs to be learned about these flags especially based on period
sources.
Greg Biggs
Military Historian
May 27, 2020


Rebel Relics Yell at Brian Akins for all your civil war relics desires.  Brian Akins brings the absolute best in Confederate Artifacts.  He does it without a pompous attitude and most of his customers become life long friends.  Rebel Relics Yell at Brian Akins today.  Feel free to call Brian Akins for service.







Burger Brothers First National Confederate Cavalry Guidon

  • Product Code: Burger Brothers First National Confederate Cavalry Guidon
  • Availability: In Stock
  • $14,500.00


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